CELEBRATING 60 YEARS


WE'RE TURNING 60!
The World Affairs Council will mark the milestone by giving YOU more ways to connect with the world all year long



 

From 1954 ...

to 2014!

 

Six decades after a group of concerned citizens came together to found the New Hampshire Council on World Affairs in Durham, the organization now marks its 60th anniversary of bringing the world to the Granite State. One thing hasn't changed: we still believe that global education and understanding is the key to peace and prosperity, here and around the world.

We will be celebrating all year long through special programs, new initiatives and MORE programs across the state. The year is already off to a great start- more than 500 people have joined us to connect with the world in just the last six weeks!

How will you help celebrate and sustain the work of the World Affairs Council in 2014?

* Join us as a member; Make an Annual Fund gift!

Since our founding, we have relied on the yearly dues of loyal members to sustain our work. In exchange, members can travel the world, access experts on foreign policy, gain special benefits and discounts AND become a part of a community committed to fostering understanding of world affairs across the state.

* Join the conversation!

Attend one of our numerous public education programs, take part in workshops or conferences for teachers and students, or exchange ideas with an emerging international leader at a global networking session.

* Meet the world!
Host an emerging international leader in your home, office or school and help create a more peaceful, prosperous world through international exchange.


THANK YOU for making our six decades of work possible and stay tuned for more anniversary news and events!



HISTORY

BY DAVID G. STAHL, PRESIDENT EMERITUS

In 1954, just after the Korean War ended and in the midst of the Cold War, the Council on Foreign Relations, with the financial support of the Ford Foundation and the endorsement of the Department of State, decided to establish a “council on world affairs” in each state in the country. The goal of these councils was to spread greater knowledge of world affairs among American people. The fundamental assumption of this initiative was that, in effect, “America could not have an effective foreign policy without public support.” The Foreign Policy Association, an organization created in 1918 to counter the isolationist attitudes of the era, was designated the coordinating body of the system of world affairs councils.

     As a result, the New Hampshire Council on World Affairs, renamed the World Affairs Council of New Hampshire only in recent years, was established in 1954 by a group of twenty-two distinguished, concerned men and women who were active in the arts, medicine, dentistry, business, law, government, politics and education. Among the founding members and leaders were Judge Peter Woodbury, Robert P. Bass Jr., John H. Morison Sr., Susan McLane, John T. Holden, Jere Chase, Robert H. Reno and Dr. David T. Stahl. In 1955, UNH’s President, Dr. Eldon L. Johnson, provided the New Hampshire Council on World Affairs with office space, heat, light and logistical support along with a modest subsidy. In 1956, the Council was incorporated in the State of New Hampshire as a non-partisan, non-profit corporation under IRS Code 501(c)3 in order to spread knowledge of world affairs among the citizenry.

    Many organizations offered support to the Council in its early years, among them were the NH Council for Social Studies, the NH Council of Churches, the NH AFL-CIO, the NH League of Women Voters, the NH Council of Colleges and Universities, the United Nations Association, the Catholic Diocese of Manchester and Rotary and Kiwanis Clubs across the Granite State. Through these connections, the New Hampshire Council on World Affairs intended to mobilize as many citizens as possible in a quest for greater knowledge of international affairs and American foreign policy. It was also an early goal of the Council to foster citizen diplomacy and intercultural dialogue by having members actively meet international guests and foreign citizens. To this day, the Council continues to work cooperatively with other private, public, state, national and international organizations to fulfill its mission “to promote the widest possible understanding of world affairs among the citizens of New Hampshire”, to foster dialogue and effectively study global politics.

            In 1957, the Council convinced the House Foreign Affairs Committee to hold hearings in New Hampshire, the first ever to be held outside Washington, DC. In 1961, the Council faced extreme political criticism for inviting a TASS correspondent from the Soviet Union to join a round table discussion by journalists. To quell the outcry, the New Hampshire Attorney General wrote a declaration that specifically stated that the Council was not engaging in “un-American” activities. In a fitting coda to that incident, the Council held a luncheon in 2002 with eight Russian judges, who had been invited to the United States under the “Rule of Law” program.

            Over the years, the NHCWA hosted famous speakers such as Allen Dulles, former director of Central Intelligence; John Foster Dulles, his brother and Secretary of State under President Eisenhower; Lt. General Leslie Grove, the Director of the Manhattan Project; Clement Atlee, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951; Dean Rusk, one of the longest serving U.S. Secretaries of State; and then-Ambassador George H.W. Bush, among other notable names. In June of 2003, members voted to change the name of the organization to the World Affairs Council of New Hampshire.

             The Council has also moved across the southern part of the Granite StateIn 2002, the Council moved its office to Pleasant Street in Concord. However, the Council shared this office with a local Realtor and space was limited, so around 2004 WACNH made Southern New Hampshire University its new home and that is where WACNH remains to this day. The Council's move to its current home in the Ford House at SNHU was completed in early 2013.


ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT - 1956
"The object for which this corporation is established is
Community education in world affairs... 'to create an informed public opinion as the democratic basis for a sound foreign policy, to operate as a coordination point and service center for interested organizations, advocating no specific policy or action, and to promote the widest possible understanding of world affairs as an essential step toward lasting peace."


 
 


   
WACNH is an independent, non-profit, educational organization located on the campus of 
Southern New Hampshire University, our mission partner.
 

World Affairs Council of New Hampshire - Southern New Hampshire University - Ford House
2500 N. River Road - Manchester - NH - 03106 - council@wacnh.org - (603) 314-7970

World Affairs Council of New Hampshire © 2010-2014
Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software